IQ

The Creative Issue

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The Digital Issue

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The Corporate
Citizenship Issue


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The Political Issue

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IQ: Political Issue

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What's in Store
for 2013

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Editorial Staff

Brandspotting

What’s that brand on the horizon coming to change our lives? Or that idea so intricately ingrained into our world we hardly notice its significance? Our team of creatives and strategists eat, sleep, and breathe brand culture—so who better to ask about the biggest of the next big things?

London OlympicsLondon Olympics
You can love or hate the branding, but not a day goes by in London where people aren’t talking about the 2012 Olympic games, on the streets or in the news. After the hardships of the last two years, this is an event that will hopefully carry England into a happier and more prosperous place. It’s a one-of-a-kind experience for a lot of people—like the schoolgirl who tested the velodrome before anyone else or the football club who will move into the Olympic stadium after the Games. 2012 promises to be an invigorating year of culture, art, music, and (obviously) sports.

Gion-Men Kruegel, Executive Creative Director, Interbrand London

WikileaksWikiLeaks
WikiLeaks is a contentious and uncontrollable catalyst for chaos. Its unpredictable revelations are causing real-time change to our world. These changes are both positive and potentially dangerous. The opportunity for a profound re-evaluation of our corporate and personal responsibilities has never been more accessible; how we digest these responsibilities will define our societies for generations to come.

Graham Hales, CEO, Interbrand London

ObamaBrand Obama 2.0
A brand whose strength goes from off the charts to underwater in 18 months, then stabilizes somewhere in the middle, is rare in the corporate world. But in politics? The question for Brand Obama on the threshold of the 2012 campaign is how to evolve the original, with its brash promise of a shiny new day, in the cold light of four years of ups, downs, and disappointments. And assuming the President secures a second term, will he feel the freedom that comes with knowing there are no more races to run? If so, the Obama Refresh may live up to the brand idea that swept him into office in ’08: Change.

Peter Cenedella, Creative Copy Writing Practice Leader, Interbrand New York

KickstarterKickstarter
Kickstarter is kicking down the barriers between ideas and reality. It’s an online platform that anyone can use to crowdsource funding for their creative projects. Artists, designers, filmmakers, musicians, journalists, inventors, whoever, can broadcast their project proposals to millions of viewers eager to contribute their support in increments from five dollars to ten thousand dollars. If you can capture the imagination of just a fraction of that crowd, you’ll have the cash to put your big idea into action. It’s a whole new way to start up.

Jeremy Grimes, Associate Creative Director, Interbrand New York

ZyngaZynga
Farmville anyone? With around 250 million monthly users, San Francisco-based Zynga has asserted itself as the clear leader in the new wilderness of online social gaming by pushing entertainment value over geek appeal. This spring, the company partnered with Lady Gaga to promote her latest album through a Gagaville world that gave players a sneak peak at the new songs, and the recent appointment of Jeffrey Katzenberg to their board is just another signal that the brand sees itself as more Hollywood than Silicon Valley.

Kurt Munger, Creative Director, Interbrand San Francisco

JapanJapan
Tokyo was awarded the right to host the 1964 Olympics in 1959. To successfully hold the games, massive amounts of infrastructure had to be completed, including four major highways, two complete subway lines, and the “bullet train” linking Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka. Japan’s incredible transformation was symbolized by the torchbearer at the opening ceremony: Yoshinori Sakai, a 19-year-old student born in Hiroshima on the day the atomic bomb was dropped on that city. Today Japan is embarking on another monumental transformation, and by drawing on the same spirit of courage and innovation displayed in the 1960s they will emerge from the disasters of March 2011 stronger than ever.

Neil Duffy, Director, Interbrand London

FYIQ

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