98
-44%
4,138 $m

The Nokia brand is at a crossroads. The company has been going through a major reinvention to focus on its networking (NSN), mapping (HERE), and Nokia Technologies divisions. New CEO Rajeev Suri's vision incorporates connectivity capable of handling exponential increases in traffic, seamless location services and technological innovation. During a time of turmoil, the brand's market share has expanded in developing countries and it has retained its position as the world's second biggest manufacturer of mobile phones-though this is changing. Nokia's deal with Microsoft to sell its underperforming Devices and Services division (comprising its smartphone and other handset businesses, design team, and most manufacturing) has led to a major cash injection into the company. As a result, its financial position is improving. Nokia has retained ownership of its patents-no doubt, a valuable source of future growth. Although these factors have a positive impact on the company, it is unclear how they will ultimately influence Nokia's brand strength and evolution. With deep associations as a mobile phone manufacturer that connects people, becoming disconnected from mobile devices could negatively affect Nokia's clarity and relevance to consumers. The future depends on how Microsoft exercises its rights to use the brand and how nimble Nokia can be in shifting to deliver its new vision. As Executive Vice President Barry French points out, Nokia began as a paper mill 150 years ago, so the brand has a history of successfully reinventing itself.

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